Isotopes
  1. Copper Isotopes Abundance
  2. Copper Isotope 63 And 65

Copper has two isotopes: Cu-63 (abundance = 69.2%, mass = 62.930 amu) and Cu-65 (abundance = 30.8%, mass = 64.928 amu). Calculate the (average) atomic mass of copper. Three magnesium isotopes have atomic masses and relative abundances of 23.985 amu (78.99%), 24.986 amu (10.00%), and 25.982 (11.01%). The recent use of copper isotopes as biomarkers for neoplasia in both human and veterinary medicine is a promising and cost-effective diagnostic tool. Two hundred and twenty-nine serum samples from 10 different species of wild felids under human care were processed through mass spectrometry to determine the ratio of heavy and light copper isotopes ( 65 Cu/ 63 Cu). COPPER-63 isotope is used for studies of impact of radiation on irregularities in material structures using methods of nuclear gamma resonance (NGR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); COPPER-63 isotope is used for production of background-free tritium targets; COPPER-63 isotope is used for studies of energy emissions in nuclear reactors.

Isotopes of the Element Copper

[Click for Main Data]

Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information.

Isotopes With A Known Natural Abundance

Mass NumberNatural AbundanceHalf-life
6369.15%STABLE
6530.85%STABLE

Known Isotopes

Isotopes
Mass NumberHalf-lifeDecay ModeBranching Percentage
52No Data AvailableProton EmissionNo Data Available
53< 300 nanosecondsElectron CaptureNo Data Available
Proton EmissionNo Data Available
54< 75 nanosecondsProton EmissionNo Data Available
5527 millisecondsElectron Capture100.00%
Electron Capture with
delayed Proton Emission
15.0%
5693 millisecondsElectron Capture100.00%
Electron Capture with
delayed Proton Emission
0.40%
57196.3 millisecondsElectron Capture100.00%
583.204 secondsElectron Capture100.00%
5981.5 secondsElectron Capture100.00%
6023.7 minutesElectron Capture100.00%
613.333 hoursElectron Capture100.00%
629.673 minutesElectron Capture100.00%
63STABLE--
6412.701 hoursElectron Capture61.50%
Beta-minus Decay38.50%
65STABLE--
665.120 minutesBeta-minus Decay100.00%
6761.83 hoursBeta-minus Decay100.00%
6830.9 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
68m3.75 minutesIsomeric Transition84.00%
Beta-minus Decay16.00%
692.85 minutesBeta-minus Decay100.00%
7044.5 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
70m33 secondsBeta-minus Decay52.00%
Isomeric Transition48.00%
70m16.6 secondsBeta-minus Decay93.20%
Isomeric Transition6.80%
7119.4 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
726.63 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
734.2 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
741.594 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
751.222 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
Beta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
3.50%
76637 millisecondsBeta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
7.20%
Beta-minus Decay100.00%
76m1.27 secondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
77468.1 millisecondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
Beta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
30.30%
78335 millisecondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
Beta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
> 65.00%
79188 millisecondsBeta-minus Decay100.00%
Beta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
55.00%
800.17 secondsBeta-minus DecayNo Data Available
81> 632 nanosecondsBeta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
No Data Available
Beta-minus DecayNo Data Available
Beta-minus Decay with delayed
Double Neutron Emission
No Data Available
82> 636 nanosecondsBeta-minus DecayNo Data Available
Beta-minus Decay with
delayed Neutron Emission
No Data Available
Beta-minus Decay with delayed
Double Neutron Emission
No Data Available

For questions about this page, please contact Steve Gagnon.

Atomic Weight

The atomic weight is the mass of an atom, typically expressed in atomic mass units (amu). For an isotope, it is the mass of the nucleus, that is the mass of the protons and neutrons, as the mass of the electrons are considered negligible. In their natural state only 21 elements exist as single isotopes, that is a sample has nuclei of only one isotope, and these are called the mononuclidic elements. Most elements exist as a mixture of nuclei from multiple isotopes, and these are labeled as the polynuclidic elements. The atomic weight of a monuclidic element is that mass of that nuclide.

For a polynuclidic element the atomic weight is the average weight based on the fractional abundance of each isotope, and this is the value given on the periodic table. Copper has two isotopes, 63Cu (69.15%, mass=62.9300 amu) and 65Cu (30.85%, mass = 64.928 amu), and so the respective mole fractions are 0.6915 and 0.3085, resulting in an average atomic weight of 63.55 amu, even though there is not a single atom that weighs 63.55 amu.

[underbrace{0.6915}_{fraction ; ^{63}Cu}underbrace{(62.9300, amu)}_{mass ; ^{63}Cu} + underbrace{ 0.3085}_{fraction ; ^{65}Cu} underbrace{(64.928 ,amu)}_{mass ; ^{65}Cu} = underbrace{63.55, amu}_{text{average mass}} note: ; 0.6915 + 0.3085 = 1]

Figure (PageIndex{1}): Natural samples of copper contain two isotopes, and its atomic weight is to four significant digits is 63.55 amu, even though there is not a single atom of copper that weights 63.55 amu.

Exercise (PageIndex{1}) How can i find my router ip address.

The atomic weight of chorine is ______________and the atomic number of chlorine-35 is________________.

  1. 35, 17
  2. 17, 35
  3. 35.4527; 17
  4. 35.4527; 35

Copper Isotopes Abundance

Answer

Copper Isotope 63 And 65

C) the atomic weight is the average of mass of all isotopes of chlorine atoms and found below the symbol on the periodic table. The atomic number is the number of protons in all chlorine atoms and is found on the top of the symbol in the periodic table.